Córdoba Day Two

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Today we visited several archeological sites, the Calahorra Tower and the Alcazar.

There are so many layers of civilizations; Roman, Visigothic (Germanic tribes invading then converting to early Christianity), Arabic and the Berber Muslim Caliphate, Jews then Christians and now modern Cordoba.

At one point Cordoba was the largest, most educated city in Western Europe. The huge population was possible with agriculture using the mechanical lifting of water from the river. This technology, along with astronomy, medicine and much more, was brought by Muslims.

Roman then Muslim bath archeological site.


Roman era sculptures in the Archeology Museum.

Roman head of Medusa in the Alcazar.

Alcazar gardens

Lemon tree in the gardens.

Three Christian kings

City view from the Alcazar tower.

City view from the Calahorra Tower.

Historic mill

View from our rooftop.

City street

Recipe for a famous Córdoban dish.

Little Compton, Rhode Island

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Alfred’s grandmother lived in Little Compton until she passed away last year. We visited mostly at Christmas and a few times during the summer. The shades of grey in the buildings, stone fences and stormy skies are beautiful.

Fences and mist

House built late 1700’s.

A walk along the road from the house to town.

Historical Museum

Produce from a nearby farmer’s market.

Astoria, Oregon

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I had a site visit in southern Washington on a Monday morning and decided to visit the Oregon coast the weekend before. I wound up in Astoria on a cold, rainy night and fell asleep in a waterfront hotel to the sound of rain on the roof and waves hitting up against the breakwater. The next morning I went for an early walk.

Astoria is the first permanent US settlement on the Pacific coast and is near on of the wintering sites of the Lewis and Clark expedition.

Astoria-Megler bridge

Near Astoria is Fort Stevens State Parks a great place to walk, learn about history and explore.

Fort Stevens State Park

Near Fort Stevens is the wreck of the Peter Iredale. She wrecked in a storm in 1906 with no loss of life and her bones remain. The day I was there the weather was freezing and the wind blew like crazy; I could easily imagine a ship being forced ashore.

Wreck of the ship the Peter Iredale